Multiflora Rose

Rosa multiflora

Multiflora Rose

Family: Rosaceae

Other Common Names: baby rose, Japanese rose, seven-sisters rose
Weed class: monitor list
Native to: Eastern Asia
Is this Weed Toxic?:

not known to be

Why Is It a Noxious Weed?

This plant is on the monitor list. Please contact the David Giblin to report locations.

How would I identify it?

General Description

Multi-stem shrub to climbing vine, growing to around 10-15 feet tall and 9-13 feet wide.

Flower Description

Fragrant flowers numerous in corymb (flat-top to rounded cluster of flowers, lower flower stems longer than upper). Flowers have 5 petals or may be semi-double or double, white to pinkish in color and around 1 inch wide.

Leaf description

Leaves are alternately arranged and compound-divided into 5-9 (sometimes 11), leaflets with toothed edges. Leaf petioles with stipules (paired wing-like structures) that are fringed, possibly having glandular hairs.

Stem description

Plants have arching stems and may or may not have prickles (thorns). Prickles curved, stout, flat, gradually tapering to broad base, paired below leaves or sparsely scattered.

Fruit Seed Description

Flowers form small, shiny, red rose hips that are nearly spherical and 6-8 mm in diameter. Hips may remain on plants through the winter.

Where does it grow?

It tolerates a wide range of site conditions and is able to invade forests, fields, pastures, riparian areas, and many other habitats. It grows over all of the eastern U.S as well as the west coast states and British Columbia.

How Does it Reproduce?

Plants spread by seed as well as by cane tips taking root once they contact the soil. Birds eat and spread the seeds.

For More Information

King County Noxious Weed Control Board information on Rosa multiflora , a species of concern

WTU Image collection of Rosa multiflora

Flora of China description of Rosa multiflora

National Park Service Plant Invaders of Mid-Atlantic Natural Areas

Invasive Plant Atlas of the United States

Additional Photos