What's New

Listing proposals for the 2015 State Noxious Weed list accepted until April 30

Every year, the Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board adopts a new Noxious Weed List (WAC 16-750). Weed species may be added or removed, the Class (A, B, or C) can be changed, or the required control area of a Class B Designate may be changed. Currently the state weed board is accepting proposals for the 2015 noxious weed list through April 30, 2014. Information about proposals and the listing process can be found here on our website.

Changes to WSDA's quarantine list, WAC 16-752

On March 12, 2014 the Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) adopted amendments to the quarantine list, chapter 16-752 WAC that:

Adds three species (oriental clematis (Clematis orientalis), French broom (Genista monspessulana), and giant reed (Arundo donax), (except variegated cultivars) to the prohibited plant list; combines five quarantines into a single prohibited plant list; repeals an obsolete quarantine (yellow nutsedge); and adds language that will allow the issuance of compliance agreements for growing or transporting regulated articles.

The quarantine is being amended as a result of a petition submitted by the Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board.

Adoption Date: March 12, 2014; Effective Date: April 12, 2014
Further information and supporting documents can be found here on WSDA's website.

2011-2013 Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board Biennial Report

The State Noxious Weed Board's biennial report is now available online. Find out about the accomplishments and challenges faced by the State Weed Board, county weed boards, resource managers, and others in the noxious weed community over the past two years. Please contact us if you are interested in receiving a hard copy.

Changes to the 2014 Washington State noxious weed list

The Washington State noxious weed list is updated every year, and all Washington residents can submit proposals to add or remove species, change the class of a listed noxious weed, or to change the designated area in which control is required for a Class B noxious weed. Anyone, including citizens, tribes, organizations, government agencies, and county noxious weed control boards may participate in the listing process by submitting a proposal or by submitting testimony about proposed changes to the noxious weed list. In fact, Washington's open, inclusive listing process is lauded by other states for its encouragement of public participation. Learn more about the listing process here.

The State Noxious Weed Board voted on the following proposed changes to the 2014 noxious weed list at their regular board on Wednesday, November 6, 2013 in Wenatchee. The votes took place after the Board considered testimony received prior to and during a public hearing held the day before. The purpose of the public hearing was to solicit citizen comments and opinions about these proposed rule changes.

All of these approved changes to the noxious weed list take effect January 1, 2014.

View the press release; the CR-101; CR-102; CR-103; SBEIS; Concise Explanatory Statement (CES); Common questions and answers about the 2014 noxious weed list proposals.

Lesser celandine, Ficaria verna, 2014 Class B noxious weed. Lesser celandine is an invasive perennial that is naturalizing over a broad geographic range in the U.S. and is spreading in Washington. Originally introduced as an ornamental, the species and its cultivars may still be sold today. Its early emergence and flowering give it an advantage over other ephemeral plants as it competes with our native understory plant communities. There is a limited window of time the plant is above ground for control before it dies back in the summer. Currently, lesser celandine is listed as a noxious weed and quarantined in Oregon and in other states. As a Class B noxious weed, lesser celandine is designated for control by the WSNWCB in Snohomish, Skamania, Stevens, and Pend Oreille counties, and other county weed boards do have the option of requiring landowners to control it at the local level. Read the proposal here. View the draft written findings here.

Tall lesser celandine

Non-native cattail species and hybrids, including Typha angustifolia, Typha domingensis, Typha x glauca, 2014 Class C noxious weed. Non-native Typha species and hybrids are capable of displacing native plants, hybridizing with our native Typha latifolia, altering marsh habitat, and invading managed aquatic systems. Non-native Typha species and hybrids have become invasive in other parts of the country and currently have a limited distribution in Washington, although recorded occurrences are increasing. Control of known populations, while they are still small and more manageable, will help prevent these invasive species from dominating valuable wetland habitat. This Class C listing increases awareness of the invasiveness of these species and hybrids and gives county weed control boards the option of mandatory, local control. Read the proposal here. View the draft written findings here.

narrow leaf cattail

Russian olive, Elaeagnus angustifolia, 2014 Class C noxious weed. Russian olive is a shrub to small tree with painful, thorny stems, fragrant yellow flowers and olive-like fruit. It spreads along waterways and has naturalized along many of our major rivers in the interior western U.S. It can crowd out important native riparian plant communities that provide valuable wildlife habitat. Listed as a noxious weed in many other states, Russian olive is growing and spreading in eastern Washington. As a Class C noxious weed, county noxious weed control boards have the option of selecting Russian olive for mandatory control at the local level and can provide education and management information on proper control methods to protect agricultural lands and native plant communities. Read the proposal here. View the draft written findings here. View the submitted written testimony here.

 

Russian olive

Reclassification of velvetleaf, Abutilon theophrasti, from a Class A to a Class B noxious weed, to be designated everywhere except Yakima and Franklin Counties. View the submitted written testimony.

velvetleaf

 

Reclassification of buffalobur, Solanum rostratum, from a Class A to a Class C noxious weed. View the submitted written testimony.
The WSNWCB strongly encourages, but does not require, control of Class C noxious weeds. County noxious weed boards may select Class C noxious weed for mandatory control at the local level. Check your county noxious weed list to see if control is required.

 

buffalobur

Reclassification of yellow-flowered hawkweed species into 2 subgenera. In an effort to simplify the non-native yellow-flowered hawkweeds (Hieracium species) on the noxious weed list, the WSNWCB consolidated the 11 separate listings (10 species and one separate listing for all other non-native hawkweeds) into two Class B listings by subgenus - Pilosella and Hieracium.

Hawkweeds: all nonnative species and hybrids of the Meadow subgenus (Pilosella), including but not limited to: mouseear (Hieracium pilosella), pale (H. lactucella), queen-devil (H. glomeratum), tall (H. piloselloides),whiplash (H. flagellare), yellow (H. caespitosum), and yellow-devil (H. x floribundum)
Designation areas:
region 1; region 2, except Pierce and Thurston counties; region 3, except Cowlitz County; Chelan, Douglas, and Okanogan counties of region 4; region 5, except Klickitat and Spokane counties; region 6.

Hawkweeds: all nonnative species and hybrids of the Wall subgenus (Hieracium), including but not limited to: common (Hieracium lachenalii), European (H. sabaudum), polar (H. atratum), smooth (H. laevigatum), spotted (H. maculatum), and wall (H.murorum)
Designation areas:
regions 1, 3, 5, and 6; region 2, except Skagit and Whatcom counties; region 4, except Stevens County.

hawkweed

hawkweed

Approved minor amendments to listed Class B noxious weeds:
- Undesignate wild chervil in Island County
- Designate yellow archangel in Island County
- Undesignate spurge laurel in Pierce and Jefferson counties
- Undesignate myrtle spurge in Clallam and Jefferson counties
- Modify Eurasian milfoil designation to include Pend Oreille County in all lakes with public boat launches except Fan Lake
- Designate hairy willow herb in Pend Oreille County
- Designate tall hawkweed in Pend Oreille County (pending hawkweed reclassification)
- Designate meadow knapweed in Pend Oreille County
- Designate Bohemian knotweed in Pend Oreille County
- Designate policeman's helmet in Pend Oreille County
- Designate plumeless thistle in Pend Oreille County
- Modify yellow starthistle designation in Stevens County to read: Stevens County except T36 R38 in the area contained within Hwy 395/Hwy 20, Pingston Creek Road, and Highland Loop Road.
- Reinstate exemption "with the exception of bulbing fennel, F. vulgare var. azoricum" to common fennel listing (unintentionally omitted in 2013)

 

 

Proposals not adopted to the 2014 noxious weed list:

 

Giant reed, Arundo donax, proposed as a Class B noxious weed. Giant reed, also commonly called Arundo, is a tall perennial, rhizomatous grass that generally grows 20 feet or taller. In riparian areas it can be highly invasive, forming dense monocultures, causing a number of negative impacts including lower biodiversity, excess water consumption, and posing a significant fire risk. Giant reed is also being tested as a potential biofuel crop and other uses due to its high biomass yield. The WSNWCB chose not to list giant reed at this time, since the Washington State Department of Agriculture has already begun rule-making to regulate giant reed. Read the proposal here. View the draft written findings here. View the submitted written testimony.

Arundo donax

Proposal to reinstate 2012 listing language of Japanese eelgrass, Zostera japonica, (i.e. a Class C noxious weed on commercially managed shellfish beds only). Read the proposal here. 2013 Non-native eelgrass: Zostera japonica workshop. Read the Draft 2014 Written Findings here. View the submitted written testimony: part 1, part 2, part 3, part 4, part 5 and addendum.
The board considered but did not adopt the proposal to reinstate the 2012 listing language of Japanese eelgrass (Zostera japonica) as a Class C noxious weed on commercially managed shellfish beds only. Since the proposal was not adopted, Japanese eelgrass remains a Class C noxious weed everywhere for 2014.

Japanese eelgrass

Weed 'em Out road signs

Weed 'em Out and Weed 'em and Reap road signs are being installed in a number of counties in Washington. Soon ten counties in Washington will have road signs with these messages about noxious weeds. Click here to see one in Clark County, here for one in Thurston County and here for a sign in Kittitas County along I-90. Look for them on a roadside near you!

State Weed Board Members: learn more about us

The Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board is made up of 12 volunteer members, of which 9 are voting members and 3 are scientific advisors. Click here to find out more about our board members interesting backgrounds and what they do. Additional information about the State Noxious Weed Board can be found here.

Mobile phone website

The Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board website has been streamlined for smart phones with the creation of our mobile phone website. This website provides key information from our full website, but is streamlined to provide information faster and in a smart phone-friendly format. You can still go to our full website from your mobile phone if you perfer by clicking on the 'full site' option on the mobile website's homepage. Check out this new mobile website by going to our regular homepage address: www.nwcb.wa.gov from your smart phone.

Updated written findings for hydrilla, fanwort and fragrant water lily

A written findings document is created when a plant is listed as a noxious weed. Three of these documents have been updated, in partnership with the Department of Ecology, for the aquatic noxious weeds hydrilla, Hydrilla verticillata, a Class A noxious weed, fanwort, Cabomba caroliniana, a Class B noxious weed, and fragrant water lily, Nymphaea odorata a class C noxious weed. Written findings for all listed noxious weeds can be found by going to the species detail page and scrolling down to the 'for more information' section.

Changes to the 2013 Washington State noxious weed list

The Washington State noxious weed list is updated every year, and all Washington residents can submit proposals to add or remove species, change the class of a listed noxious weed, or to change the designated area in which control is required for a Class B noxious weed. Learn more about the listing process here.

This year, the State Weed Board voted on and approved all of the following changes to the 2013 noxious weed list.

All of these changesl took effect January 1, 2013. All counties in Washington will have French broom added to their Class A species list. All counties, except Pend Oreille and Stevens County, will have tall hawkweed added to their Class B species list. Counties have the option to choose Class C noxious weeds for mandatory control at the local level.

Download the press release here. View the CR-101; CR-102; CR-103; SBEIS; OTS; Concise Explanatory Statement

French broom, Genista monspessulana, Class A noxious weed. View the draft Written Findings here.

French broom

Tall hawkweed, Hieracium piloselloides, Class B noxious weed. View the draft Written Findings here.

Tall hawkweed flowers

Common teasel, Dipsacus fullonum, Class C noxious weed. View the draft Written Findings here.

ccommon teasel

Common barberry, Berberis vulgaris, Class C noxious weed. Find more information at the WSU CAHNRS and Extension Research website on stem rust and barberry in the Pacific Northwest. View the draft Written Findings here.

common barberry

Other Changes:

Amend current listing of Japanese eelgrass, Zostera japonica, Class C everywhere (rather than limiting to commercially managed shellfish beds only as presently listed).View the Written Findings from 2011 here. View the Japanese eelgrass submitted written testimony here.

Austrian fieldcress, Rorippa austriaca, changed from a Class B noxious weed to a Class C noxious weed. Read information about Austrian fieldcress here.

Blackgrass, Alopecurus myosuroides, changed from a Class B noxious weed to a Class C noxious weed. Read information about blackgrass here.

Common catsear, Hypochaeris radicata, changed from a Class B to a Class C noxious weed. Read information about common catsear here.

Polar hawkweed, Hieracium atratum, changed from a Class B noxious weed to a Class C noxious weed. Read information about polar hawkweed here

Lawnweed, Soliva sessilis, changed from a Class B noxious weed to a Class C noxious weed. Read information about lawnweed here

Lepyrodiclis, Lepyrodiclis holosteoides, changed from a Class B noxious weed to a Class C noxious weed. Read information about lepyrodiclis here.

Longspine sandbur, Cenchrus longispinus, changed from a Class B noxious weed to a Class C noxious weed. Read information about longspine sandbur here

Oxeye daisy, Leucanthemum vulgare, changed from a Class B noxious weed to a Class C noxious weed. Read information about oxeye daisy here.

Perennial sowthistle, Sonchus arvensis ssp. arvensis, changed from a Class B noxious weed to a Class C noxious weed. Read information about perennial sowthistle here.

Swainsonpea, Sphaerophysa salsula, changed from a Class B noxious weed to a Class C noxious weed. Read information about Swainsonpea here.

Wild carrot, Daucus carota (except where commercially grown), changed from a Class B noxious weed to a Class C noxious weed. Read information about wild carrot here.

 

Updated the state Class B designation regions from 10 regions to 6 regions. View the new region map here. WSNWCB amendment.

 

Update state Class B designations for Class B noxious weeds. View the proposed Class B designations here. WSNWCB amendment.